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Why Canada should rethink its immigration policy

Despite pro-immigration “diversity is our strength” platitudes/rhetoric coming from the Federal Liberals, the facts are starting to show that this may not be true. PhD student Sanjay Jeram, who was quoted in a column by Douglas Todd for the Vancouver Sun, said, “Housing, employment, urban congestion, the welfare state and training are all affected by Canadian immigration policy”. With 300,000 people entering the country each year (to put that in perspective, it’s the population of Laval is 420,000) it’s fair to ask how those numbers are bearing out. Ontario, British Columbia, Quebec and Alberta are the provinces that carry the biggest burden when it comes to accepting new immigrants. Ontario is leading the way, receiving a staggering 52 per cent of new immigrants—the grand majority of which are going to Toronto, and Quebec amd British Columbia receiving 17 and 16 per cent, respectively. The Globe and Mail claimed that, out of one million immigrants this government plans to take in, 58 per cent will be economic, 27 per cent family class and 14 per cent will be refugees. While 58 per cent being economic immigrants might sound nice, the fact is even the most well-educated immigrants coming to Canada have a difficult time acquiring work in the country within the first five years of arrival, according to a Global News article. This puts a tremendous burden on our welfare system. Furthermore, “millionaire migrants,” as described in David Ley's book of the same name, showed that many were paying less taxes on average than other immigrants and refugees, and not declaring their global assets. This once again puts tremendous short-term strain on landed immigrants and natives alike. Wealth inequality has also risen more quickly in Canada than it has in the United States over the last decade, according to the Canadian… Read More

Trudeau’s approach to the TPP is a good sign for Canada

Negotiating a deal that would secure fair trade with 11 nations, including some of the world’s biggest economies, is not easy. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, after taking his time to announce any progress with the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), has declined to sign an agreement in principal to finalize the TPP, according to several sources. Trudeau has come under intense scrutiny, from media at home and abroad, for not showing up to a meeting about the TPP in Vietnam and delaying the TPP talks further. Trudeau nonetheless maintains that it shouldn’t have been a surprise to anyone. Despite the reaction from most people, and his stubbornness, I agree with how Trudeau has handled the situation. In a deal that is as far-reaching, and because of how much of Canada’s economy will be effected in this deal, Trudeau should be focused on what is best for Canada. If being stubborn on the terms, and missing out on a meeting, secures Canada a better deal, the negative press is worth it. There have already been changes made to the deal regarding the automotive sector—a vital part of Canada’s economy. I find that Canada has been far too timid in past economic deals, and it is refreshing to see a Prime-Minister, especially one in the Liberal party, take a stand for the well-being of Canada’s economic future. I like Trudeau’s firm stance on the TPP for one specific reason, and it actually goes beyond the reach of the TPP. With ongoing North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) talks becoming increasingly difficult, this can serve as practice for when Trudeau must eventually come to terms with U.S President Donald Trump. Trump has chosen to remove the United States from the agreement, prompting re-negotiations. The NAFTA agreement, should it be reinstated, will effect cross-boarder relations with… Read More

Why “America First” Is Really “Americans Last”

NOTE: This article does not reflect the opinions of Generation Screwed, but only those of its author, Renaud Brossard. Imagine this scene: you’re in rustbelt America. Manufacturing jobs around you keep disappearing. You shop at the local Wal-Mart because, let’s be honest, that’s pretty much the only thing you’ve been able to afford since the local plant shut down. In the aisle, you see a vacuum cleaner just like the one that used to be made in the neighbouring town. You lift the price tag and, where once proudly stood the words “Made in America,” you see “Made in Mexico.” You can’t help but let out a sigh as you think back to only a few years ago, when your life plan seemed so simple—so perfect. After you graduated high school, all you had to do to ensure a secure financial future was apply to your local factory, which was expanding massively at the time. The application was nothing more than a formality, and you would get a good, middle-class job that was guaranteed for pretty much the rest of your life. You wouldn’t be rich, but you would have a good life. As you put the vacuum cleaner back in its place, you can’t help but miss those simpler times. When you put yourself in those shoes, it’s easy to understand the appeal of protectionism. What could be described as “America First” policies, or their local equivalents across the world, start making sense to you. Populist movements, both from the left and right, have been spouting the same rhetoric for years, although the terms they use vary. It culminated in the United States with Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump both promising to bring back manufacturing jobs to the U.S. and to drastically cut down on trade ties around the… Read More

Why we need Bill 62

Political controversy isn't new to Québec, and every time a new bill gets passed, the news spreads through all of Canada. The latest piece of legislation comes in the form of Bill 62, a bill which prohibits the use of face-coverings while receiving government services. Naturally, the bill is being criticized as Islamophobic as the Islamic face veil -- known as the niqab -- is restricted under this ban. There are fair arguments for opposing the bill. For example, the bill also prohibits riding the bus while having face-coverings. This, I find ridiculous, as it will be difficult to ensure bus drivers will enforce the law. However, unlike some, I look at this bill as an attempt to ensure public safety. In this day and age, terrorism remains a threat, and as unfortunate as that is, the government needs to be able to identify those who they are serving. I agree with the bill solely for the protection of our government institutions. I wouldn't feel comfortable as a government employee serving someone I cannot identify. That includes all face-coverings, not just the niqab. I truly don't understand those who oppose the bill on the grounds of Islamophobia. It is common knowledge the niqab is not an Islamic requirement. Only those in the extreme sects of Islam support its use. If you want to wear the niqab at home, that is your right. However, in a world where identification can be key to the protection of our society, you can't have your face covered when dealing with government officials or offices. This debate is reminiscent of the legal battle in 2015 fought between the then-Conservative government under Stephen Harper, and Zunera Ishaq. Where Ishaq fought and won the right to wear her niqab while being sworn in as a Canadian citizen.… Read More

Age requirements for the Canadian citizenship test should not change

As of Oct. 11th, several changes occurred in the required steps for Canadian citizenship. Most of these changes are minor issues centered around the amount time spent in Canada while applying, meaning that applicants have to stay in Canada for a certain amount of time while the application goes through. Frankly, these mean very little to me. What has me angry is the new age range for the Canadian citizenship test. The new regulations, as quoted from the Canadian government website are such, ”[The] age range for language and knowledge requirements reduced to 18-54 years old”. The ages were previously 14-64. To me, reducing this age requirement is insane. I believe most naturalized Canadian citizens don't know enough about our country's history--so why are we scaling back the expectations needed for future Canadians? As for the language requirement, does it not seem crazy that immigrants aged 14-17 and 55-63 don’t need to be qualified in English or French when they become Canadians? The younger immigrants are somewhat understandable, as they are children, but even so, how will they succeed in Canadian schools? The older immigrants should have to know English or French, or else how will they get jobs and contribute to the Canadian economy? Immigrants make up a large portion of our economy, but to have them lacking in our two languages seems ridiculous.     I am all for immigration to Canada, as we are a multicultural nation with varied backgrounds. However, Canada has a long and rich history, and to allow some immigrants not to take this test is an insult to the history of Canada, especially during the 150th year of confederation. Shouldn't we all know about the places we live in? Even children aged 14-17 should have to take the test. They will be taking Canadian… Read More

Millennial Media Moguls: Danielle Finestone

Disclaimer: Danielle and I are first cousins and have known each other our whole lives   Millennial Media moguls is a series of interviews with millennial entrepreneurs, young people who are making a living in jobs that didn’t exist a generation ago. Creating unusual jobs for themselves that seize on the new opportunities of the twenty-first century economy. Though also a part time employee of Yelp and sometimes a social media consultant, Danielle Finestone makes the bulk of her income from her Instagram page. Danielle is the owner operator of ToFoodies; a page which depicts delicious food from all over Toronto. ToFoodies started as a passion project of hers only 3 years ago born out of her love for Toronto night life. After years spent in the industry, a year ago Danielle quit her full time job at a major record label to take on ToFoodies full time. In that time she has made enormous strides toward growing her brand with currently over 72,000 followers. Nathaniel: So start at the beginning. How did ToFoodies start? Danielle: It wasn’t a straight path that brought me here, although it seems that way in hindsight. I did my undergrad at Ryerson in the Radio and television arts program. My specialty was in studio television since that’s what I wanted to go into. I interned like crazy -- every summer I had a different internship that opened me up to everything going on in the entertainment industry in Toronto. I interned at Yelp, MTV, Sony Music Canada and the Marilyn Dennis Show, and each one of those introduced me to a lot of people in different sides of the industry. N: Would you say your education played a big role in setting you on the path you’re on now? D: Getting an education really… Read More
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