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The Prince Arthur Herald

Canada Election 2015: Week Seven in Review

For the duration of the federal election campaign, the Prince Arthur Herald will be publishing weekly reviews. The reviews feature commentary by our columnists and contributors on the most important issues and developments of the campaign. Be sure to regularly check the website, and to follow us on twitter to stay up to date as we head toward October 19th.   - At last, a week that the Conservatives can be content with. The week was dominated by the economy and immigration yet again. We started with positive economic news from Finance Canada validating Stephen Harper’s claim that Canada now has a balanced budget, as a surplus of $1.9 billion was run the last fiscal year. Another big news story was the Federal Court of Appeal striking down the federal government’s appeal to a lower court decision striking down the ban on face-covering veils in citizenship ceremonies. This revives a debate in which the Conservatives have an edge in public opinion compared to the NDP and the Liberals, who both agree with the courts thus far. Conservative candidates in Quebec have intensified their campaigning on the promise of bringing the case to the Supreme Court and ensuring citizenship oaths are taken with only uncovered faces. The Bloc Quebecois can be benefactors of this along with the Conservatives in the staunchly secular province of Quebec, as they rail against the NDP on this issue with their latest attack ad.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVE-N-htzKs   The week closed with a debate where Trudeau was outperformed by Harper and Mulcair. He was ill-tempered at times, frequently interrupted the others, and did not look prime ministerial alongside Mulcair and the much calmer Harper. He laid out the opportunity for a marijuana joke (at his own expense) on a silver platter for Mulcair. Furthermore, Trudeau continued to… Read More

Canada Election 2015: Week Six in Review

For the duration of the federal election campaign, the Prince Arthur Herald will be publishing weekly reviews. The reviews feature commentary by our columnists and contributors on the most important issues and developments of the campaign. Be sure to regularly check the website, and to follow us on twitter to stay up to date as we head toward October 19th. -   This past week, with Conservative campaign manager Jenni Byrne off the plane and back in the war room, the media have been speculating more than ever on how the Conservatives are feeling. Panic says the media. I have to say, every piece I read that mentioned Ottawa’s most powerful woman had me laughing at the fact that these pieces have mostly been written by individuals who have never met nor spoken to Byrne, and never will. She goes on tour, she comes back: massive speculation. Tiring gossip aside and half way through the campaign, it is surprising to note that half of Canadians still appear undecided on who to vote for. And contrarily to conventional wisdom, the refugee crisis in the Middle East may not have harmed the Conservatives as much as Canada’s liberal elite would like it to have. According to a new EKOS poll, the Conservatives are now at 31.8 points as opposed to 26.9 for team Trudeau, and 29.6 for Thomas Mulcair’s NDP. What is more certain is that recent issues in the media have consolidated the CPC base, and their members appear more engaged. Politics is a blood sport, and although at the end of the game king and pawn fall into the same box, players should put forward the right pieces at the right time. Australian Lynton Crosby’s arrival to advise the Conservative campaign is far from a sign of panic, and his… Read More

Canada Election 2015: Week Five in Review

Into week five, the campaign remains packed with action. For the duration of the federal election campaign, the Prince Arthur Herald will be publishing weekly reviews. The reviews feature commentary by our columnists and contributors on the most important issues and developments of the campaign. Be sure to regularly check the website, and to follow us on twitter to stay up to date as we head toward October 19th. -   This past week ultimately had our politicians discussing the refugee crisis in the Middle-East. Media and politicians pounced on the topic after photos circulated in the media of a three-year-old boy lying dead on a Turkish beach. Although the toddler’s family had not applied to enter Canada, false accusations against the Conservatives for rejecting the family’s application flew across the media. So what are our leaders proposing exactly? The Conservatives propose continued military action in the region to counter ISIS, and promise to bring in 10 000 more refugees from the Middle-East over the next four years if re-elected. It is worth noting that a similar commitment was taken last January. Of the 10 000 additional Syrian refugees promised then, as of late July only 1002 have resettled in Canada as part of this commitment. Both the NDP and Liberals propose to take in more refugees, but oppose military action. As for the polls, current projections by Éric Grenier, founder of ThreeHundredEight.com, place the NDP at 32.1% ahead of the Liberals at 29.5% and the Conservatives at 27.7%. There is still a ways to go in this campaign, and as Gilles Duceppe put it “Canada is up for grabs!”. Anything could happen. The campaign is expected to kick into high gear as of Labour Day. Mathieu Paul Dumont is Editor-in-Chief of the Prince Arthur Herald -      … Read More

2015 Maclean’s Debate in Review

Thursday night’s debate was rapid paced. Topics moved quickly from recessions, emissions, separation, to ISIS. Leaders had their say on issues that they believe matter most to Canadians. Who won, who lost, what were the most important take aways, and what does it mean for the rest of the race? Here’s our review.   -- A bit chaotic at first, the Maclean’s debate was ultimately a success. A shaky camera now and then hardly matters. Who won is a challenging question. All attacked Stephen Harper who, although seemed to want to rush out the door (he skipped the press conference at the end), defended his nine year record with pride. Justin Trudeau showed up with his pants on, and did very well. A key moment for Trudeau is definitely his response to Thomas Mulcair on the clarity act. “I’ll give you a number: nine. My number is nine. Nine Supreme Court justices said one vote is not enough to break up this country, and yet that is Mr. Mulcair’s position.” Elizabeth May didn’t have much to lose; she appeared relaxed, in control, and determined on environmental issues. Surprisingly, the most nervous of the four must have been Mulcair. He did not do so well against a confident Harper with an impressive talent to keep speaking when interrupted. In hindsight, look out for Trudeau’s passionate ideas and defense of groups like the veterans. He may come up fast in that rear-view mirror if he manages to express himself clearly throughout the campaign. Mathieu Paul Dumont is Editor-in-Chief of the Prince Arthur Herald --   Get rid of the media consortium, and it turns out you can have a pretty substantive debate. Who knew? All things considered, last night’s debate was highly informative, but it was not a game changer. Every leader held their… Read More

Free Speech on Campus Series: University of Waterloo

Just over one year ago at the University of Waterloo, Kitchener Centre MP Stephen Woodworth was invited to speak to members of a pro-life club on campus. Woodworth had previously tabled a private members' bill, asking Parliament to form a committee to examine when life begins. However, when Woodworth began to give his presentation on campus, he was quickly heckled by protesters who claimed that his, “talk about the universality of human rights came from an oppressive western discourse that ignores the rights of indigenous people”. However, the protesters failed to explain how Woodworth’s bill was even remotely relevant to this issue. The campus police requested that Woodworth leave the event in the interest of his safety. I started my studies at the University of Waterloo in the fall and was pleased to see that Stephen Woodworth was scheduled to give another presentation to the UW Students for Life. However, in light of the previous disaster, admission would occur on a ticketed basis. My concern is not to argue the pros and cons of the abortion debate, but to bring into question the reasoning that is so often used to strip away the right to free speech. The protesters at this event defended their actions by saying that they were done in the interests of indigenous rights. In other words, these actions were defended by proponents of “social justice”. The problem that “social justice” presents is twofold. The term itself is incredibly subjective and its usage can be as broad as it user intends it to be. The Waterloo Public Interest Research Group (WPIRG)'s “action groups” receive funding via an automatic fee levied on students. These groups are set up to address various social justice issues, but must receive prior approval from WPIRG. Thus, in this case social justice is defined by… Read More
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