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Larry O'Brien

Lansdowne — Ottawa’s golden opportunity

It ‘s been said that political campaigns are about promises while governance is about making decisions and progress, but sometimes it’s hard to connect the dots between promises and action in a functioning and healthy democracy. Initiating the revitalization of Lansdowne Park is a good example of that difficulty.It was important to me to finally fix Lansdowne since it was a major campaign promise I made in 2006—I even had an interactive video of how Lansdowne should be fixed on my 2006 web site. Along with taxes, the transit tunnel, and the new convention centre, it formed a large part of my campaign. Furthermore, as a lifelong resident of Ottawa, I’d become embarrassed over its rundown condition.Lansdowne Park had been in a sad state for the last twenty years or so when Roger Greenberg, John Ruddy, Bill Shenkman, and 67’s owner Jeff Hunt first approached me with the idea of bringing CFL football back to Ottawa. I pounced on it as a chance to make good on one of my campaign promises. Fixing Lansdowne in the most efficient way was my key motivation for this project.Many citizens thought  the CFL returning to Ottawa was the key driving force for this project, but they were wrong. It was almost a side car issue for me that the CFL would be returning to Ottawa—first and foremost, the goal was to finally fix  Lansdowne Park and do it in such a way as to enhance the City for the next 100 years. To do so, the four promoters took on a massive project that has tested the skills and patience of their exceptional team of professionals.The broad-based support for progressLansdowne was  a controversial  project, but it captured the support of the National Capital Commission  (N.C.C.), Parks Canada, and most importantly the majority of Citizens. Lansdowne Live even solved the trade show space… Read More

Larry O?Brien: Lansdowne ? Ottawa?s golden opportunity

It 's been said that political campaigns are about promises while governance is about making decisions and progress, but sometimes it's hard to connect the dots between promises and action in a functioning and healthy democracy. Initiating the revitalization of Lansdowne Park is a good example of that difficulty.It was important to me to finally fix Lansdowne since it was a major campaign promise I made in 2006—I even had an interactive video of how Lansdowne should be fixed on my 2006 web site. Along with taxes, the transit tunnel, and the new convention centre, it formed a large part of my campaign. Furthermore, as a lifelong resident of Ottawa, I'd become embarrassed over its rundown condition.Lansdowne Park had been in a sad state for the last twenty years or so when Roger Greenberg, John Ruddy, Bill Shenkman, and 67’s owner Jeff Hunt first approached me with the idea of bringing CFL football back to Ottawa. I pounced on it as a chance to make good on one of my campaign promises. Fixing Lansdowne in the most efficient way was my key motivation for this project.Many citizens thought  the CFL returning to Ottawa was the key driving force for this project, but they were wrong. It was almost a side car issue for me that the CFL would be returning to Ottawa—first and foremost, the goal was to finally fix  Lansdowne Park and do it in such a way as to enhance the City for the next 100 years. To do so, the four promoters took on a massive project that has tested the skills and patience of their exceptional team of professionals.The broad-based support for progress Lansdowne was  a controversial  project, but it captured the support of the National Capital Commission  (N.C.C.), Parks Canada, and most importantly the majority of Citizens. Lansdowne Live even solved the trade show… Read More